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My Christmas Wish | Coates and West: Philosophy and Journalism

The stories we tell ourselves, this shared mythology, is psychologically what human minds do to understand the world. These stories, or mythologies, can sometimes cloud our belief about what is actually happening and what needs to happen in order to make things balanced again.

Dr. Cornel West is a learned philosopher. For me, he tells stories in their most complete form: with the intention of healing the human psyche by informing the audience about what is actually happening and what needs to happen in order to maker things balanced again. Mr. Coates is a journalist. Dispassionate, to a degree. He holds a belief that our shared story is a tragedy. Coates tells a mythology, if it is incorrect, that interferes with our shared efforts to understand our communities, our culture, and ourselves.

As I perceive West, his concern is that stories that do not inform the human psyche about the active ego and the Self, may ultimately lead to misinformed judgments and bad decisions. West gives me the full arch story of humankind—the story of Gods and Men and the Reconnecting with the One. This is what the human psyche needs for good psychological health and healing. This mythology is an epic human story. It is why we tell stories. This over-arching story, because of it’s deep understanding of all aspects of the truer reality of humanness, often encompasses the other basic story plots, including comedy, rebirth, the quest, and tragedy.   West tells the story of who we are: Ego versus Instinct; dismantling the Self versus reconnecting with the Self.

My Christmas wish is that these two gentlemen synergistically write the story of us: Coates’ storytelling skill mashed–up with West’s philosophical wisdom. Then, our efforts to learn about the world and the people in it will be freed from sentimentality, violence, and sensationalism. Healing of hearts and minds can be realized.

West and Coates: Self-transcendence and Obligation to the Truth

Agnostic or atheist viewpoint is not the issue. Identity is. Identity is politics. Politics as in: how individuals choose to govern themselves. Identity as in: Self who is morally, ethically, and culturally, intentional, responsible, and accountable to themselves, Others, and the larger society; to find just, equitable and compassionate means for allocating resources amongst the peoples on planet Earth. Identifying as Self and Self as Other is one of the most meaningful, purposeful acts of being human.

So what’s the beef between these two individuals, Dr. Cornel West and Ta-Nehisi Coates? There is none. Each writer is expressing an aspect of the whole. Just as visible light enters a prism and exits into arrays of color, so too have these commentaries. So what are we to make of these two perspectives? We can reflect back on the totality that is the larger truth. For example, race and class are inter-related and indivisible. That is to say, you cannot talk about one without acknowledging the affect and effects of the other. They are inextricably bound together. So what is the conversation? For me, a budding ClassCrits scholar, it is about human identity. How is it that some humans transcend perceived differences that serve to divide and create hierarchies? How did Gandhi become Gandhi, or King become King, or Hamer become Hamer, or any of the women and men of praiseworthiness determine in their minds to identify with the totality, the larger truth?

Through my research and multi-disciplinary study, I’ve come to understand that many people will achieve self-actualization, yet only a few perhaps reach self-transcendence, where pursuit of equity and access to those known conditions necessary to achieve human potentiality is the expression of their authentic Self. And, that any human-made politic that seeks to deny or hinder the flourishing of full human potentiality for everyone must be denied.

What does this mean? Well, to start, take Dr. West’s position of criticizing (and, he does also occasionally provide positive critique) elected leaders. It is the intentional exercise of responsible holding-of-account of elected leaders. Dr. West, for me, informs his audience of where improvement can and must be made. These admonitions illuminate, up-close, where humanity can and must do better. In this way, current and future leaders can increasingly make judgments reduced of bias and heuristics, thereby reducing errors in decision-making on critical policies that form the culture and society.

It appears that Mr. Coates is seeking a similar end, in that one characteristic of journalism is obligation to the truth. Yet I do not know, from his writings, if Mr. Coates is seeking, for himself, his community, or the larger culture/society, the psychological well-being found in recognizing and accepting the unknowable/unknown (aka this cosmic, grand wondrous, and awesome thing called existence), and accepting the unifying truth behind it: a commitment to unitive values; and the realization that in the moment of decision-making there appear to be dualities, yet the way through the tension is to seeking and realize collectivist values (goals, interests, and motivations). These concepts may sound funny to the ear, yet are scientifically sound. The concepts are gaining broader understanding outside academia and research laboratories.   As so many wise humans have said before, are saying now, and will continue to say, “Love is the answer, peace is the way.”

Jobs, Industry, and Cantankerous Old Men

The title was so catchy, I couldn’t resist reading this essay by Christopher Ketchem at Truthdig.  Two points caught my attention:

“I’ve been thinking recently of another old man, a friend of the family named A.J. Centola, who went homeless a few years back… A.J. and I used to sit around gabbing on afternoons, walking around the old neighborhood, Carroll Gardens, where he grew up during the last Great War, [with]… merchant marines in boardinghouses, and dockworkers, ironworkers, grocers, and freelance laborers like him.”

 

 

“…A.J. said one day. “…You have one class now in Carroll Gardens, the mono-class of the rich. No industry, no trades, no jobs for the average person to pull himself up. Now it’s all restaurants on Court Street that the old-timers can’t afford. People live their whole lives in the same place, and then this is not their place.” 

 Christopher Ketcham: God Bless Cantankerous Old Men – Essay – Truthdig

What struck me was the idea that there were jobs in the neighborhood:  diverse jobs in industry (ironworkers), trades (grocers) and manual labor that paid good enough to raise a family on (merchant marines, dockworkers).  As both Robert Reich and John Taylor spoke to on PBS Newshour today, the principle problem is jobs and low economic growth.

If Americans want to get serious about increased jobs that pay wages sufficient to grow and build a middle class, we’re going to need industry, trades, skilled and manual labor sectors.  I can’t imagine a highly industrial America.   But its clear jobs will have to come in many different forms, to fit different worker skills. 

It won’t be easy, but I’m confident adjustments will be made by government so that capitalism again advances the interests of the people.  Gainful employment is at the top of everyone’s list.

 

Did You Hear? Democracy Needs Trustworthy and Impartial Information|the Educating Gossip™

Feel It, Love It!

Ohhh this makes me feel sad but also more determined

“Gone with the Papers,” written by Chris Hedges ( http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/gone_with_the_papers_20110627/)  noted: 

 “We are losing a peculiar culture and an ethic. This loss is impoverishing our civil discourse and leaving us less and less connected to the city, the nation and the world around us.”  And also, “A democracy survives when its citizens have access to trustworthy and impartial sources of information, when it can discern lies from truth, when civic discourse is grounded in verifiable fact.”

The writer holds passionate beliefs about the role of a free and impartial press especially now as “[T]he increasing fusion of news and entertainment, the rise of a class of celebrity journalists on television who define reporting by their access to the famous and the powerful, the retreat by many readers into the ideological ghettos of the Internet and the ruthless drive by corporations to destroy the traditional news business are leaving us deaf, dumb and blind.”  Powerful stuff.  Love It!