Category Archives: Philosophy

Debiasing 2016 Election | A Hero’s Journey

When debiasing oneself from intuitive thinking—System 1 the fast, automatic and emotional, and System 2 the slow, deliberate and systematic –one can understand and accept that it is indeed the beliefs and ideology held by the candidates that matter. Ideology, the integrated assertions, theories and aims that constitute a sociopolitical program
is different from beliefs (defined as a degree of conviction of the truth of something especially based on a consideration or examination of the evidence.) Both a candidate’s belief and ideologies matter. Although in this coming election, people may feel that there is not a significant difference between the candidates, there are in fact very significant differences both in beliefs and ideologies. In the hero’s journey that is life, one takes up the courage to explore the differences in the candidates as it relates to ideology and beliefs about democracy, and the people whose lives will be affected by the selection of a candidate. This process often challenges one’s own biased, intuitive thinking. It is often uncomfortable yet necessary as an informed voter. Own it! Feel It! Live It! Love It!

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Debate on Long-Term Assisted Care Insurance Part 2

On February 1, 2012, at 7:05 p.m. the U.S. House of Representatives members voted to repeal a part of the 2010 health care law, the CLASS Act that provides long-term health care services. In October, the Obama administration said that it would not implement this portion of the law.  The bill was sent to the Senate for consideration.

America is about empathy and responsibility: people caring both for themselves and for one another, and acting responsibly on that sense of care. When I hear otherwise, I wonder if the speaker really understands and wants this vision of America. There is certainly room in America for those who can afford it to purchase long-term assisted care insurance. And they are free to do so. The real question here is: What about those Americans who can not afford to purchase long-term assisted care insurance? And, we’re talking about the majority of Americans – hundreds of millions of people.
American democracy has two roles: protection and empowerment for all its citizens. It’s a myth only recently created in American that people make it on their own. In fact, nobody makes it on his or her own. Yes, the individual is responsible to pursue happiness, and in doing so, meets countless individuals who have made contributions to their success.
Your Exercise
Own It: What are your moral values when it comes to others in our society? Whose ideas in this debate do you identify with most?
Feel It: How do these values make you feel? (Review the list of emotions on this blog site)
Live It: Contact your Senator(s); share your experience with long-term assisted care insurance; and let them know what you value in the life of aging adult living in America.
Love It: Be happy about your contributions to the debate. Tell six other friends about this site, the CSPAN video and your hope for America.

Philosophy 1A- To Whom Do We Owe a Duty of Care?

Debate on Long-Term Assisted Care Insurance

On February 1, 2012, the U.S. House of Representatives members debated a bill to repeal a part of the 2010 health care law, the CLASS Act that provides long-term health care services. In October, the Obama administration said that it would not implement this portion of the law.  You can read more at CSPAN.org. Read More

Everyone should enjoy listening to this debate.  It’s an easily accessible discussion in basic philosophy.  And, it is discussed by some House members from a conservative strict moral values perspective, and by other House members from a progressive affectionate care and attention moral values perspective.

As you read, listen or view the debate, see if you can pick out which moral values perspective each speaker is “Owning It.”  How does it make you feel when you hear the moral value perspective?  For anyone who has tried to contract  for long-term care insurance, they will tell you the coverage is limited, the insurance premium costs are high, and there is no certainty that the company will be economically stable to pay benefits by the time coverage is needed.

Your Exercise

Own It:  What are your moral values when it comes to others in our society?  Whose ideas in this debate do you identify with most?

Feel It:  How do these values make you feel? (Review the list of emotions on this blog site)

Live It:  Contact your House of Representatives member(s);  share your experience with long-term assisted care insurance; and let them know what you value in the life of aging adult living in America.

Love It:  Be happy about your contributions to the debate.  Tell six other friends about this site, the CSPAN video and your hope for America.


Debate on Long-Term Assisted Care Insurance

Teachable Moment: Moral Panics, Anthony Weiner and Seal Team Six Insights

Can we separate political ethics and morality from personal ethics and morality?  This seems to be the question America has been struggling with for some time.   “Moral panics” are what George Lakoff refers to them in his book The Political Mind Why You Can’t Understand 21st-Century American Politics with an 18th-Century Brain.

America likes to gossip about the personal details of a public person’s life—the more outrageous, the more perplexing, and the more morally confounding the better. Such talk is considered “juicy” and America could talk about it all day long.

Representative Anthony Weiner is at the center of the current moral panic.  Should he resign?  Should his wife divorce him?  Can he be trusted as an official elected to represent the voters of New York?  Is he “true” to them?  And if he indeed walks his political talk, should his actions within his marriage matter?  Can we separate his morals and his ethics?

We can make a distinction between the two that I think is useful.  Ethics refers to a theory or system that describes what is good and, by extension, what is evil.  Morals refer to the rules that tell us what to do or not to do.  Morality divides actions in to right and wrong.

Ethics are more theoretically focused:  How do we judge white-collar crime versus violent crime?  How do we allocate health care when demand and costs out strips resources?  Mythology and theology are the oldest sources of ethics, though philosophical systems are often more discussed today.

Ethics are about theory, while morals are about practice.

Morales are the rules you live by; ethics are the systems that generate those rules.  Morals have to do with your personal life:  What is appropriate behavior on a first date? Is taking a ream of paper from your job home for personal use a crime?

Teachable Momemt: SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper author Howard Wasdin said to Jon Stewart on the 6/9/2011 Daily Show, that although he is a republican and did not vote for President Obama, Wasdin would consider doing so in the future because the President had it right on three accounts: keeping the mission operations secure, burying binLaden’s body at sea, and not releasing the pictures.  Wasdin admired the President’s political actions.

Should we really care about a politician’s personal actions?  Some say we should, for it gives insight into that person’s theory or system by which they judge good and evil and thereby decide what to do.

Stay tuned.  As we enter another presidential election cycle, the major weakness of ballot-box elections will once again become glaringly apparent:  the voters decide on a candidate by making an X rather than by exploring what it means to be the best candidate for the job.

The influence of smear campaigns, misleading political ads or the force of party-line habit voting, will make it a struggle for voters to possess a deep understanding and consensus on policy issues and thus elect the best candidate for the job.

Attack on Religion or a Call to Discovery?

 I have a friend, a learned scholar, who brought this engaging exchange to my attention posted at The Science Network.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson

It’s a talk by  Neil deGrasse Tyson basically saying that religion is what some early scientists turned to when they could not explain the unknown and was used to fuel their creative thought.  The talk is lively and fun.  Tyson tells us to keep in mind that some of the greatest minds that have preceded us expressed notions of  intelligent design  when faced with the limits of their knowledge. “Science is a philosophy of discovery, intelligent design is a philosophy of ignorance. “     He encourages us to acknowledge that people are feeling at the limits of their knowledge when they invoke the notion of intelligent design.  He also encourages us to be self-aware of when we are at the limits of our knowledge and not let our belief systems limit our creativity, our search for knowledge.   Fun, fun, fun.

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Michael Shermer

Dr. Tyson is joined on the panel by speakers including  Michael Shermer, author of “Why People Believe Weird Things.”  Michael Shermer takes a social scientist’s point of view, asking the question:  what are the different variables that go into a person’s belief system?   He states that smart people believe weird things “because they are better at rationalizing beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons.   Which is to say that most of the beliefs that most of us hold we arrived at because we were raised that way, or we were influenced by peers or mentors.”   It’s human nature to want to find reasons to justify what we believe. 

Another panalist states that business interests understand that science and innovation is important for the economy but they don’t particularly care if there is a large number  of uneducated people.  However, from the public policy and government affairs  point of view, it is critically important that citizens are educated.  In the United States, elected officials are tasked to represent and put into law policies and practices that the voters want.  If the people are uneducated on the most basic of human affairs, bad policy and government will result.  Business and government need educated people–business may need a few, but good government requires many more.

I started this blog to encourage myself and others to challenge beliefs.  First, acknowledging and modifying beliefs in light of new discoveries (“Own It”).  Then, acknowledge how the updated beliefs make us feel (“Feel It”), put those new beliefs into daily practice (“Live It”), and then be happy with our lives (“Love It”). 

It’s worth the 75 minutes to view the program because it makes you think about religion and beliefs in a different way. For me, this program was a reminder that wisdom (religion, philosophy, psychological) is a means for people to seek a deeper human experience and be encouraged to press forward, even in the face of seemingly overwhelming confusion, doubt, and unknowns. I felt both hopeful that public policy will balance the teaching of science and intelligent design in schools and happy that there is a role for belief in play in people’s creative lives. Watch the program and let me know how it made you think about what you believe, if it made you modify what you believe and how that makes you feel as you deeply connect with people and the world around you.

Who Can You Trust?

We all have beliefs, ideas, and concepts that influence our understanding of the world and behavior– whether they’re aware of it or not.  Understanding  the beliefs of others is a step toward trusting their opinions and decisions.  Check out this article   http://pdfcast.org/pdf/trust-the-importance-of-trustfulness-versus-trustworthiness  I found it interesting that first, we need to understand the difference between trustful and being trustworthy; and then, second, how being untrustworthy tends to make us less trustful/trusting. 

Here at the Educating Gossip, we’re going to have fun looking at our personal degree of trust in government and other public institutions estasblished to advance the public good.  We’ll explore actions by public agencies regarding issues such jobs, wealth creation and health care.  We’ll discuss what we believe is impartial, honest and competent.  We’ll have fun doing what is good for our selves, our community and the world.  We are what we believe and we will: Own it, Feel it, Live it and Love it!