Category Archives: Live It

Live It! Love It! | Be Brave, Live Courageously

OPPOSITIONAL CULTURAL PRACTICE, INTEGRAL THEORY, & SPIRAL DYNAMICS – A REFLECTION

The concept of memes resonates with the philosophy of Grace Lee Boggs, an activist philosopher from Detroit Michigan. Ms. Boggs was of the belief that once you have reached a goal, you have stagnated. Her idea was that movements, activism, growth, creativity, art, is in constant movement. It is always in development. The movement grows, evolves and changes.

Jared Anderson, in his January 25, 2017 JFKU blog post Spiral Dynamics Theory and the 2016 Presidential Election states, “After the green postmodern stage is integral consciousness. This new stage has an extremely important feature which is that it is not just a meme jump, but a tier jump. This jump is moving from an ethnocentric identification into a world-centric identification.” This is an interesting statement from an historical perspective. Consider Ms. Boggs as an example. In the documentary of her life, American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, she is asked why she has experienced neither psychological cognitive dissonance nor conflict with being a woman and a Chinese American in a predominately African American community doing civil rights work. The persistent asking of this question by the documentarian Grace Lee perplexed Ms. Boggs. After some reflection, Ms. Boggs noted that her formative years in the movement preceded the women’s rights movement and the Asian American rights movement. Thus, her perspective was not segmented nor informed in this way. This reflects the early civil rights movement when the movement itself was universal, seeking freedom for all oppressed peoples in the world, with a focus on the trials and struggles of African-Americans. And so it seems Mr. Anderson is suggesting that we are now in a meme that is reflective of the early days of the civil rights movement. A time when the emphasis and focus was on global liberation of people everywhere, with attention, in America, on advancing liberation through securing civil rights for African-Americans, and by extension, all Americans.

That said, Oppositional Cultural Practice™ is a return this homoversal and universal values focus, along with an emphasis on humility. Mr. Anderson writes, “World-centric thinking is the world of, “I am right, but partial, and so are you.” This is indeed a welcomed consciousness evolutionary step, yet one that is not new. As it is written in Ecclesiastes, there is nothing new under the sun. Perhaps the time is now ripe for world centric thinking to bear fruit once again (recalling the civil rights gains of the 1930’s and 1960’s.) The challenge, as I see it, will be to expand this renewed focus on world-centric thinking and humility (a willingness to hold the thought that one could be wrong and that an adjustment to one’s thinking may, and probably will, need to occur.) In Oppositional Cultural Practice™, historical critique and criticism coincide with spirituality to transform both self and society.

The JFKU online courses I have developed, and that are available for everyone’s edification, speak to these ideas through Oppositional Cultural Practice™. Although the courses provide continuing education units for lawyers, the content is designed to be accessible and practical for all people who desire to experience personal and social transformation. Through these courses, one can gain new understanding into world-centric consciousness and its connection to the world’s wisdom traditions.

Legal Practice and Feeling Go(o)d: #1 California Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 3-110 Failing to Act Competently

Legal Practice and Feeling Go(o)d: #2 Critical Race Theory – Introduction to the Genre, Intellectual Influences and Emerging Issues

Legal Practice and Feeling Go(o)d: #3 Competence Issues

Legal Practice and Feeling Go(o)d: #4 Practice, Praxis and Connecting with Feelings of Well-Being

The journey of transformation can be emotionally charged for some individuals, as it requires critique and criticism of deeply held beliefs, often up-ending reality as we once knew it. The courage to change one’s reality can be grasped. At the February 2, 2017 screening of Abby Ginzberg’s film Soul of Justice: Thelton Henderson’s American Journey, at Berkeley Law, Judge Henderson, when asked where he found his source of courage, said

“Through seeing bravery, I became bolder and bolder. You learn courage by seeing courage.”

My strategy for the next four years is to organize and build alliances based on universal values; and to imagine, create, and realize new institutions, systems, and structures that bend the arch of the moral universe towards justice. Interested in joining me on this journey? Go to the online course catalogue and sign up. I look forward to engaging with you there.

Written by Kim E. Clark, J.D. Adjunct Professor and certified Spiritual and Social Transformation changemaker. View her work at SSRN Author ID: 2430405

Contact her at the Educating Gossip 

TAGS: Consciousness & Transformative Studies; Law; Legal Studies; #EducationForChange #EducatingGossip #Women’sHistoryMonth #jointogether #standup4humanrights #fightracism #AfricanDescent

HOLI, LENT, LAW & ME | Spring Festivals and Celebrations…

HOLI, LENT, LAW & ME

Spring Festivals and Celebrations – Getting up close to examine[1] spirituality, law and me as both an individual and a member of community.

Own it!

Through critique and criticism, I examine my thoughts and own what I believe– leaving space to modify my beliefs as new and truer information is received.

Spring ushers in the arrival of celebrations. Today, people are celebrating Holi, a Hindu spring festival known as the “festival of colors.” The festival signifies the arrival of spring and the victory of good over evil. Other people are well into Lent, a Christian spring celebration. Lent is a time of year when individuals and community reflect on how to live together as one, on this planet. The individual engages in self-refection to identify and sacrifice a personal behavior that impedes realization of this universal goal. (It is not self-punishment or extreme hardship.) Recurring rituals and traditions are designed to bring the individual and the community together to advance peace and harmony.

Laws alone cannot create a civil society. The individual and community also have a responsibility to develop local customs and set of behaviors, and to inspire to the spirit and aspirations of the democratic society.

 Feel It!

I acknowledge the scientific fact that emotions influence the thoughts that inform my opinions.

I can easily feel discouraged and isolated and alone when I am seemingly in community with people. I attend conferences and seminars, book club meetings and other gatherings. Yet I leave with no lasting connections. What I realized in reading about Lent is that the scheduling and looking forward to engaging with groups and individuals who share a common desire for inclusive love, without judgment, creates a different dynamic. It can create more satisfying feelings of community and shared accountability to others, and myself.

Live It!

I can act more consciously in ways that form my experiences of the world; shape the lens through which I see the world; that filters the thoughts that form my understanding of others and myself.

So for Lent, my self-sacrifice and repentance is to release behaviors that keep me from maintaining a deeper awareness of my human nature (that is, to produce thoughts that can be biased; to feel and be influenced by emotions; to need to be connected to something greater than myself). I will sacrifice anxiety about current events and instead, face the reality of uncertainty. I will sacrifice doubt about expressing spirituality.  I will accept that it is a human motivational need. I will sacrifice my fear of death (non-being) and instead, act in ways that affirm that all humans are created equal and it is their nature to pursue happiness.

Love It!

I’m now more fully aware of my thoughts, how they influence my feelings and actions. I experience life with more emotional well-being and happiness.

[1] the Educating Gossip pioneered an approach life using critique, criticism, emerging science of how humans acquire belief through the processes of the brain (thoughts and emotions), and the spirit or energy of belief is expressed in the world.

UPDATE Individual Fears Produce Racist Acts – Transformation and Healing on the Horizon | Educating Gossip

LIVE IT!

PART I

The American Bar Association Journal posted on September 22, 2016 that the police officer who shot and killed stranded motorist Terence Crutcher on September 16, 2016 will be charged with manslaughter in that fatal shooting.

As I posted recently, emotions are linked to racial beliefs. According to reports, Officer Betty Shelby has said in an affidavit she feared for her life and had ordered Crutcher to get down on his knees.

One wonders where the fear arose from: Is it a result of police training that teaches to treat everyone as a criminal, rush in spouting commands, and feel the emotion of fear if the individual reaches for a closed driver’s door?

And, is it possible the professed fear arose from some paradigm shared by others in the police department? (A paradigm is a set of understood assumptions that are not meant to be tested; in fact they are essentially unconscious. These buried assumptions are part of one’s every day thinking.) Note that both the Tulsa World newspaper and Tulsa television station KJRH later reported that video footage contradicted initial reports:

7:43 p.m.: Helicopter footage begins, showing Terence Crutcher slowly walking with arms up toward his vehicle while being followed at a close distance by two uniformed officers. One of the men in the helicopter notes that it appears a Taser is about to be deployed, and the other comments that Crutcher “looks like a bad dude, maybe on something.”

One must ask, “How can one make such a character assessment from high above in a helicopter?” And why pull a gun? Clearly others on that police force understood that other less lethal options were available and in fact one officer had Taser sights on the stranded motorist.

PART II

Daniel Kahneman has reportedly stated that it is his hope that the modes of thinking that result in bias and errors in decision-making will become widely understood and efforts will be made to adjust one’s thinking so that bias and errors are reduced or eliminated. He calls this educating gossip. In this case, perhaps one sees System 1 intuitive thinking behind both the officer’s actions and the helicopter pilot’s statement. Intuitive thinking is fast, automatic and emotional and often based on paradigms (simple mental rules of thumb), and thinking biases that result in impressions, feelings and inclinations.

Perhaps what we witnessed was representativeness heuristic. Heuristics, very simply stated, involves or serves as an aid to problem-solving, learning or discovery.  Representativeness heuristic is when an individual intuitively thinks that different events that seem similar to the individual have a similar likelihood or occurrence—when often they don’t. Perhaps this different event of a stranded black male motorist seemed similar to some other event where danger was present, when in fact, this occurrence was not the same.

 

Take a look at this under 2 minute video to hear what educating gossip is:

 

PART III

System 2 thinking poses other bias and errors in thinking.

According to Kahneman, System 2 thinking is rational thinking that is slow, deliberate and systematic and based on considered evaluation that result in logical conclusions. And yet, System 2 lazy thinking can lead to errors and bias in decision-making.

Perhaps confirmation bias resulted in the killing of the stranded motorist, Terence Crutcher. Confirmation bias is intuitive thinking (fast, automatic and emotional and often based on paradigms (simple mental rules of thumb), and thinking biases that result in impressions, feelings and inclinations) towards interpreting information in a way that confirms preconceptions. Clearly, the pilot voiced his preconception that the motorist “looks like a bad dude, maybe on something.” Here, it is difficult to identify what information about a motorist and a stopped vehicle can be interpreted in a way that perhaps confirmed these preconceptions.

One can also consider perhaps an additional System 2 bias at the center of these police actions: Halo Effect and WYSIATI.

The Halo Effect is intuitive thinking biased by existing judgments about a person—if one judges the person negatively in one respect, one is likely to assume they will be negative in another. In other words, Shelby may have been judged Cruther to be a “bad dude” in one respect, leading to an assumption that he is a “bad dude” in this circumstance. (Note that there is some debate in race studies about possible underlying psychological anxieties, reinforced by racial stereotypes, that often result in acts of violence against racial minorities.)

WYSIATI

WYSIATI is intuitive thinking biased by the assumption that “What You See Is All There Is” where one discounts or ignores what one does not know; jumping to conclusions on the basis of limited information. WYSIATI helps to explain over confidence, framing effects, and base-rate neglect biases.

Perhaps the officers were over confident, intuitively believing that they were encountering a ‘bad dude.’ WYSIATI rule implies neither the quantity nor the quality of the evidence counts for much in subjective confidence (like the motorist’s hands in the air; the vehicle stopped in the road.) The confidence that individuals have in their beliefs depends mostly on the quality of the story they can tell themselves about what they see, even if they see little. They often fail to allow for the possibility that evidence that should be critical to their judgment is missing—what we see is all there is.

WYSIATI also helps to explain other bias that may have been present at the point of decision-making by the officer. Perhaps the framing effect bias also was present. The framing effect is when different ways of presenting the same information often evokes different emotions. If the same information of a stranded motorist had been the same, yet the different way of presenting was a white female or a white elderly male motorist, that information might have evoked different emotions in the police officers such as compassion, empathy, provision of aid instead of evoking feelings of fear. (If indeed we accept this defense of fear to be accurate.)

And lastly, WYSIATI also helps to explain another bias that may have been present at the point of decision-making by the officer: Base-rate neglect. The personality description perhaps held by the police of Cruther as a ‘bad dude’ is salient and vivid, and although one surely knows that there are more black male law-abiding citizens than black male ‘bad dudes’, that statistical fact almost certainly did not come to mind when they first considered the hapless motorist.

PART IV CONCLUSION

It is highly likely System I and System 2 biases were in play during this tragic encounter between police and a motorist needing roadside assistance. Many questions arise: Why were the responding police officers so suspicious? Why did the officer rush in rather than take the time to assess the situation? Why not see the situation as a motorist needing assistance rather than a ‘bad dude’ who needs to be shouted into submission? Why the use of lethal force? These and many more questions can be answered by bias and errors in decision-making: System I and System 2 thinking.

The good news is that as people talk about and consider these human biases and errors in thinking, educating gossip will become more natural and commonplace, thus displacing intuitive thinking that is fast, automatic and emotional and often based on paradigms (simple mental rules of thumb); and thinking biases that result in impressions, feelings and inclinations. And by reducing lazy System 2 thinking that can lead to errors and bias in decision-making.

Watch the video again about educating gossip and join me in owning our beliefs; feeling courage to change those beliefs so when we know better we can do better; live a better life in community with others; and love the life you live. Let’s start edugossiping!!

Own it! Feel It! Live It! Love It!

the Educating Gossip ™

 

#OscarsSoWhite | #WhiteBETAwards

As a social justice activist and social movement scholar, I believe the more irons in the fire (that is to say, creative solutions to the crisis), the better. When one solution gets hot, we can hit it and forge (implement) correction action.

What we can do Now:  Visual Signs of Protest and Support

Perhaps others in the industry who also believe things must change in order for people of color to be nominated more fairly, can quickly build a coalition amongst the people in the industry to wear arm bands, ribbons, something that stands out on camera on the night of the awards. This will show the academy and the world that the industry recognizes there is a crisis, and is willing to do something to bring about change.

Other Strategies

I appreciate Jada Pinkett Smith’s comments. I’m not certain, but think she is suggesting that the people in the industry come together and have their own alternate awards.

I still believe separate is not equal. At a time when there is support for modifications to the voting process the academy uses, I would advocate for weighted votes: the older you are, the less weight your vote gets. This action can be supported on at least two solid grounds: to reflect the voter’s distance from current events; and the voter’s probable status of not having viewed many of the recent movies under consideration. These are reasonable grounds for the action.

Although I hear Spike Lee and Rev. Al Sharpton’s call for a boycott, I believe it makes those who are concerned and are willing to work for a better solution invisible by their absence. Boycotts have their usefulness. I’m just not sure this is neither the time nor place to use that strategy. But again, more irons in the fire, more possible opportunities for solutions and positive resolution to the crisis.

Living It and Loving It,

the Educating Gossip™

Living it AND Loving it!

In August of 2014, a seminary awarded me a Changemaker Fellowship. After a year of academic study and research, I received a Certificate in Spirituality and Social Transformation in May of 2015. The journey over this past year has been intense and transformative. As a result, the mission for the Educating Gossip™ has taken on renewed energy and focus.

This October 24th , I presented a paper titled “Critical Race Theory, Transformation, and Praxis” at the ClassCrits VIII conference. The Educating Gossip™ is exploring the intersectionality of race, debiasing policy using the critique methodology developed by activists in the ClassCrits movement, and those of Daniel Kahneman, along with theological, psychological, and philosophical techniques to critique beliefs.

The Educating Gossip™ has been invited to present this paper to another group of activists this month. And, plans are being made to bring this teaching online. So, keep checking back to find out how you can benefit from this research.

Living it AND Loving it!

What I Need to Know and Do About Global Climate Change

There's Still Time to Save the Planet.
There’s Still Time to Save the Planet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whoa…well, what I need to know about climate change is that the world’s people need to do something about it NOW.   Uh duh.  Scientists, world leaders, activists and others have been trying to get our attention for many years now.  Climate change is now at a crisis point.  But, I’m feeling hopeful because there are things I can do to move national policy forward.

According to an interview in Oprah magazine, former Vice President Al Gore believes that in a crisis, people tend to pull together.  He notes that during super storm Sandy, “We saw New Jersey governor Chris Christie and President Obama put partisanship aside and act in a powerful and unified way.”  I believe that Congress will get the message that teamwork is required for national service.  National debate and discussion will occur on this issue, options will be identified, and public policy will be enacted.

It’s not greed.  Bankers and corporations do what will advance their interests.  They are doing what the economic system is telling them to do.  Pressure from citizens is effective when it goes to the power structure and clearly says that unless the system is changed, we all will be facing a very big problem.

OWN IT     FEEL IT      LIVE IT      LOVE IT

Own It

I’ve come to understand that there is a lot of misinformation and confusion in the discussion about what’s happening with the climate.  But after watching, reading and listening to diverse voices, I own my belief that the global will experience in the coming years major weather impacts due to changes measured in the increasing carbon in the atmosphere.

Feel It

I understand the feelings about this issue:  it feels frightening, confusing, and hopeless.  But with action, I feel that I am working with a team of Americans who understand that it it makes no difference if the climate crisis is manmade or not.  What matters is that humans must prepare for the impacts of increased climate volatility, rising oceans, food production disruptions, etc.  And, if we can do things now that can slow down the climate change, let’s do it now.  To be on a team with esteemed scientists, economists, and world leaders makes me feel joyous, happy, and confident.

Live It

What am I doing?  I’m participating on the Bill Moyer & Company site  at PBS.org following along with the discussion about this issue.

Love It

And…I’m loving it!  When my family and friends ask me, “Whatcha doing?”  I tell them about the books I’m reading, the DVDs and programs I have watched, the petitions I’m supporting and the discussions I’m having with people around the globe who are, like me, passionate about this issue.

Follow me on Facebook and Twitter to see who is leading the debate and discussion on global climate change.  And…get involved!

the Educating Gossip™

 

CIVICS 1 B – Let’s Go!

CIVICS 1 B – Let’s Go!

In the United States, we have an economic system and a political system.  Most people tend not to distinguish between the two.  But it is very important to do so.  Let’s look a little closer at the political system.

The Foundations of the American Political System

You’re probably learned, or knew at some time or another, what the basic values and principles are that form the foundation for the American political system.  In a democracy, this knowledge and understanding among the citizens is expected to increase with each year of our lives.  With age comes wisdom.

The fundamental expressions for American principles and values are important to understand for many reasons.  Americans are people bound together by the ideals, values, and principles they share rather than by kinship, ethnicity, or religion, which are ties that bind some other nations of the world.

Americas’ ideals, values, and principles have shaped their political instructions and affected their political processes.  The ideals, values, and principals set forth in the nation’s core documents are criteria that Americans use to judge the means and the ends of government, as well as those of the myriad groups and organizations that are part of civil society.  So, understanding of fundamental principles provides the basis for a reasoned commitment to the ideals, values, and principles of American constitutional democracy.

Theses values and principles of constitutional democracy that the American political system is based upon can be found expressed in such fundamental American documents as the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution including the Bill of Rights, the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, the Federalist Papers, and Antifederalist writings.  Other documents which express and elaborate upon the values and principles of the founding documents include the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham City Jail, and landmark U.S. Supreme Court decisions.  Such fundamental expressions of American principles and values are important for us to understand.  It is from these ideals and thoughts that American democracy is shaped

Americans realize that the United States and its constitutional democracy are not utopian.   It has its shortcomings and there is room for improvement.  However, a constitutional democracy is a way of allowing the competing ideas, values, goals, and interests of the people, individually or in groups, to compete with one another in a peaceful manner.  A constitutional democracy affords its citizens means of reconciling their differences and their competing visions of truth without resorting to violence or oppressions.  Constitutional democracy is a limited government, where powers governing the people are shared at the national, state, and local levels.  The founding documents saw this complex system as a means of limiting the power of government and placing in the hands of the people numerous opportunities to participate in their own governance.  This system helps us hold our governments accountable, and helps to ensure the protection of the rights of individuals.

America’s Presence on the World StageThe United States exists in a global community.  We are part of an interconnected world in whose development we play an important role.  America’s political democracy has a profound influence abroad.  Our democratic ideals and the benefits of its open society have drawn the attention and inspired the hopes of people worldwide.  And just as the ideas expressed in the writings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the U.S. Constitution, and other fundamental expressions of American principles and values has a profound influence abroad, we must also remember that America and its citizens have been deeply influenced by the institutions and practices of other countries and the cultures of other peoples as well.

We need, as a minimum, to acquire basic knowledge of the relationship of the Unites States to other nations and to world affairs.  Citizens need to make judgments about the role of the United States in the world today and what course American foreign policy should take.  This means we need to understand the major elements of inter-national relations and how world affairs affect our own lives, and the security and well being of our communities, states, and nation.

OWN IT, FEEL IT, LIVE IT, LOVE IT

OWN IT

Sounds daunting, but it’s not.  We’ve been acquiring an understanding of American democracy while in grade school through high school.  The seeds of successful citizenship have been planted in us all our lives.

  • We understand that citizenship in this American constitutional democracy differs from membership in authoritarian or totalitarian regimes.
  • We understand that each citizen is a full and equal member of a self-governing community.
  • We understand that each citizen has fundamental rights.
  • We understand that each citizen is entrusted with responsibilities and must carry out those responsibilities.

Just as we are responsible in our civil society to cleanup after ourselves, drive safely and be courteous, we also know that we are responsible to make certain that the rights of other individuals are respected.  It’s also a fundamental responsibility of citizens to make certain that government serves the purposes for which it was created and does not abuse the power that the people have delegated to it.   The Declaration of Independence, for example, proclaims the primary purpose of government: “That to secure these Rights (Life, Liberty, ad the Pursuit of Happiness) governments are instituted among Men.”   And, the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution says that the purposes of government are to “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty.”  We as citizens strive to hold our government accountable to these purposes it was created to serve.

FEEL IT

We need to be unafraid and rather fearless and fierce to

  • continually expand our intellectual and participatory skills, and
  • work tirelessly to improve our public and private character traits.

Our private character traits include becoming an independent member of society; assuming the personal, political, and economic responsibilities of a citizen; and respecting individual worth and human dignity.

Our public character traits include participating in civic affairs in an informed, thoughtful and effective manner; and promoting the healthy functioning of American constitutional democracy.

Sometimes these traits of public and private character are referred to as civic dispositions.  We must all understand the role and importance of these civic dispositions in our system.  We have to be considerate of the rights and interests of others, and of participating in civic affairs in an informed, thoughtful and civil manner.

LIVE IT

Our learning and applying civic knowledge and skills is influenced all the time: at home, social interaction among friends, relatives, members of the community, co-workers, neighbors, television, online media, radio, and even the entertainment programs we choose to watch.  All of these life contexts provide arenas in which our civic knowledge is acquired, civic skills are used, and civic traits of public and private character are applied.  It’s where we learn about rules, accepted behaviors, and basic democratic and constitutional principles and values.  And, we also recognize how deeply influenced we are by the institutions and practices of other countries and the cultures of other peoples.

LOVE IT

Although some would argue that in general, civil society is on the decline in America, I see it more as something each one of us can work on improving.  As individuals, as we each enjoy participating as citizens in this constitutional democracy, our lives will be richer.   It provides new meaning in our lives: to grow our understanding of American constitutional democracy and renewed purpose in our lives: to live responsibly, increasing our knowledge, intellectual and participatory skills.

We’ll own it – the role of governments and the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs; understanding fundamental principles that provides the basis for a reasoned commitment to the ideals, values, and principles of American constitutional democracy.

We’ll feel it – the impact of the various levels of government on our daily lives, the lives of our communities, the welfare of the nation as a whole, and world affairs.

We’ll live it – read, develop our intellectual skills, make informed judgments about the role of governments, seek diverse information sources, engage in many participatory opportunities to be involved in government in addition to elections, campaigns, and voting.  We’ll exhibit civic dispositions by thoughtfully participating in public affairs, and civic life—traits such as public spiritedness, civility, and respect for law, critical mindedness, and a willingness to listen negotiate, and compromise are indispensable for the nation’s well-being

We’ll love it – be filled with joy and happiness as we attain individual and public goals, hand-in-hand with participation in political life.  We’ll unabashedly declare that as participating citizens, we are maintaining and improving our American constitutional democracy that is dependent on us to be informed, effective, and responsible.

Debate on Long-Term Assisted Care Insurance Part 2

On February 1, 2012, at 7:05 p.m. the U.S. House of Representatives members voted to repeal a part of the 2010 health care law, the CLASS Act that provides long-term health care services. In October, the Obama administration said that it would not implement this portion of the law.  The bill was sent to the Senate for consideration.

America is about empathy and responsibility: people caring both for themselves and for one another, and acting responsibly on that sense of care. When I hear otherwise, I wonder if the speaker really understands and wants this vision of America. There is certainly room in America for those who can afford it to purchase long-term assisted care insurance. And they are free to do so. The real question here is: What about those Americans who can not afford to purchase long-term assisted care insurance? And, we’re talking about the majority of Americans – hundreds of millions of people.
American democracy has two roles: protection and empowerment for all its citizens. It’s a myth only recently created in American that people make it on their own. In fact, nobody makes it on his or her own. Yes, the individual is responsible to pursue happiness, and in doing so, meets countless individuals who have made contributions to their success.
Your Exercise
Own It: What are your moral values when it comes to others in our society? Whose ideas in this debate do you identify with most?
Feel It: How do these values make you feel? (Review the list of emotions on this blog site)
Live It: Contact your Senator(s); share your experience with long-term assisted care insurance; and let them know what you value in the life of aging adult living in America.
Love It: Be happy about your contributions to the debate. Tell six other friends about this site, the CSPAN video and your hope for America.

Philosophy 1A- To Whom Do We Owe a Duty of Care?

Debate on Long-Term Assisted Care Insurance

On February 1, 2012, the U.S. House of Representatives members debated a bill to repeal a part of the 2010 health care law, the CLASS Act that provides long-term health care services. In October, the Obama administration said that it would not implement this portion of the law.  You can read more at CSPAN.org. Read More

Everyone should enjoy listening to this debate.  It’s an easily accessible discussion in basic philosophy.  And, it is discussed by some House members from a conservative strict moral values perspective, and by other House members from a progressive affectionate care and attention moral values perspective.

As you read, listen or view the debate, see if you can pick out which moral values perspective each speaker is “Owning It.”  How does it make you feel when you hear the moral value perspective?  For anyone who has tried to contract  for long-term care insurance, they will tell you the coverage is limited, the insurance premium costs are high, and there is no certainty that the company will be economically stable to pay benefits by the time coverage is needed.

Your Exercise

Own It:  What are your moral values when it comes to others in our society?  Whose ideas in this debate do you identify with most?

Feel It:  How do these values make you feel? (Review the list of emotions on this blog site)

Live It:  Contact your House of Representatives member(s);  share your experience with long-term assisted care insurance; and let them know what you value in the life of aging adult living in America.

Love It:  Be happy about your contributions to the debate.  Tell six other friends about this site, the CSPAN video and your hope for America.


Debate on Long-Term Assisted Care Insurance

Economy at Risk with short-term deal on debt

Oooh..there are groups wanting citizens to be active in this debt-ceiling theatrical production.  What fun and opportunity to have your voice heard.  I’m filled with excitement and hope.  What a terrific opportunity for folks to separate political theatre from actual governing.  For example, I stumbled upon this link

Tell Boehner: Do Your Job
Sign up & Tell Boehner – “It’s Time
to Compromise On The Debt Celing!”
www.DSCC.org/Boehner-Do-Your-Job New Window

I’m sure there are others on all sides of the political belief spectrum.  Point is,  “Whatcha doin’?” Are you getting involved, gathering information about this issue,  talking to those who share your beliefs and those who do not, owning your beliefs;  taking time to really let yourself feel the emotions about the political theatre versus  the budget policy?  And then doing something about it?  Own It, Feel It, Live It, Love It.

There are so many places to get started.   The reality is that the debt ceiling is being used as political theatre for back-room deals.  Meanwhile, the Nation is facing some serious negative outcomes if the debt ceiling is not raised and the government is not transparent about the budget.

For example, at CBS News reports:

The first is market stability – the perilous nature of the current talks have spooked rating agencies which are threatening to downgrade the U.S. credit rating, which would spike interest rates, making it harder and more expensive for everyone to borrow money and pay back loans, especially the federal government. Preventing that possibility for as long as possible is a good thing. Stability in knowing that Washington won’t be going through another debt debate again soon will help calm the market and investors.

(Credit: AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The White House reiterated its opposition today, saying that “a short-term extension could cause our country’s credit rating to be downgraded, causing harm to our economy and causing every American to pay higher credit cards rates and more for home and car loans.”

A close second reason: Simply not having to go through this again. The morass that has overwhelmed Washington looks bad for all sides, and shows that the federal government is not functioning well. The president believes that going through this debate for a second time in the near future would be a futile exercise, made even more difficult by the fact of 2012 being an election year.

And third? Yes, politics. Keeping the debt and spending issue away off the front pages and out of the election season will be a good thing for the White House, just as much as getting a big debt deal done would help show that President Obama is serious about getting the nation’s financial health in order.

While the president may wish to avoid the politics of another debt ceiling increase until after the next election, the White House is hoping that stability in the debt issue will take away one nugget of uncertainty that could be dragging down the economy. With certainty in the markets, their hope is that the economic recovery could get back on track. They fear going through another debate like this wouldn’t help.

“What we’re not going to do is to continue to play games and string this along for another eight, nine months, and then have to go through this whole exercise all over again. That we’re not going to do,” said the president, optimistically.

After Republicans backed out of the latest rounds of talks, an angry president charged them with going for a short term goal to play politics with the debt issue.

“How serious are you actually about debt and deficit reduction? Or do you simply want it as a campaign ploy going into the next election?” he said Friday night.

via Why Obama wants to avoid short-term deal on debt – Political Hotsheet – CBS News.

 

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